Wolf Spider - Allocosa obscuroides

Wolf Spider

Allocosa obscuroides

Other Names: Lycosa obscuroides, similar to Tasmanicosa Sp.
Family: Lycosidae (Wolf Spiders). 130 known species in Australia, most in the genus Lycosa. Many other Australian species of wolf spiders are similar in appearance.
Size: Body 15-18 mm
Distribution: Species of wolf spiders are found in a very wide range of habitats, from deserts to rainforests.
Habitat: Wolf spiders are ground dwellers and many species make burrows. They have extremely good vision and can see polarised light, which gives them exceptional skill at navigating.
References: Find-A-Spider Guide. Brunet. Whyte and Anderson.

Wolf spiders get their name from their hunting style of chasing and running down their prey, like a wolf or dog would.

A closely related wolf spider in the genus Lycosa, Lycosa tarantula, is the species that was originally called the tarantula. It was named after the city of Taranto in Italy, where it is found. In one of those strange quirks of science, the spiders now known as tarantulas are in a completely different family (Theraphosidae).

There was once a traditional belief that if one of these "tarantula wolf spiders" bit you, it would lead to a hysterical condition known as "Tarantism" for which the only cure was to dance a special dance called the tarantella. This is now understood to be completely false and these spiders are not regarded as dangerous to humans.

Danger: Australian wolf spiders are not especially dangerous, though they can cause transient pain and sickness. At least one source says they can be deadly to smaller animals such as cats and dogs. According to Whyte and Anderson, "human bites have been recorded with various unpleasant but usually short-lived results, the worst being acute pain for 10 minutes to an hour, local swelling, redness and itchiness. Dizziness, rapid pulse and nausea have been reported."

Note that dead spiders usually fade in colour, so nearly all the spiders will look blacker or darker in colour in real life than they do in the photos of dead spiders from the museum.

Wolf Spider - Allocosa obscuroides
Photo taken at Australian Museum, Sydney. High Resolution 4196 x 2832.

Wolf Spider - Allocosa obscuroides
Photo taken at Australian Museum, Sydney. High Resolution 4120 x 2644.

Wolf Spider - Allocosa obscuroides
Photo taken at Australian Museum, Sydney. High Resolution 2876 x 1432.

Wolf Spider - Allocosa obscuroides
Photo taken at Australian Museum, Sydney. High Resolution 3992 x 2692.

Wolf Spider - Allocosa obscuroides
Photo taken at Australian Museum, Sydney.

Wolf Spider - Allocosa obscuroides
Photo by Robert Kraft. Face of a large wolf spider, species and country unknown. High Resolution 1280 x 1050.

Recommended Reading

A Guide to the Spiders of Australia, by Volker W. Framenau, Barbara C. Baehr, and Paul ZborowskiA Guide to the Spiders of Australia, by Volker W. Framenau, Barbara C. Baehr, and Paul Zborowski.

This is a great field guide to Australian spiders. It's a toss up between this one and Spiderwatch for my second favourite spider field guide. This one is a lot different to Spiderwatch. It's got more than twice the number of pages. It's got much better photos. It comes with a soft clear plastic cover protecting the usual soft cover. On the other side of the argument, it's got no index other than an index of family names (i.e. no index of actual spider names, not their common names and not their scientific names). Which makes it hard to find things in it, if you don't know what family they are in. Also it's based on families and not individual spider species. It's still a wonderful book though.

From the publisher, "This definitive guide to the subject, written by three experts in the field, offers a window into a fascinating world. Notorious species such as the Redback and the Sydney Funnel-web sit alongside less wellknown but equally intriguing spiders such as the ant-mimics and net-casting spiders. The introduction covers spider structure, evolution, reproduction, silk and venom, together with peculiarities of the family within an Australian context. The two main sections of the book deal with Trapdoor Spiders and Modern Spiders, and within each section there is a chapter on each of the 80 or so spider families that occur in Australia. Each is illustrated with beautiful photographs of the subjects, with more than 30 images per family for some of the larger groups such as the jumping spiders, and many rare images never before published. "

Purchase from Australia (Booktopia)

See Also

Return to Australian Spiders
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